What does “bit under the weather” mean?

Learn about the idiom 'under the weather' and its origins in the sailing industry. Discover how it's commonly used today to describe feeling slightly ill or unwell.

Understanding “Under the Weather”

“Under the weather” is an idiom that means to feel slightly ill or not quite oneself.

It is a common phrase used to describe a person who is not feeling well.

Origins of the Idiom

The origin of the idiom “under the weather” is not clear, but it is believed to have originated from the sailing industry.

Sailors who were feeling seasick were often sent below deck to avoid getting wet from the weather.

The phrase “under the weather” was used to describe these sailors who were feeling sick and confined below deck.

Current Usage

Today, the phrase “under the weather” is used to describe anyone who is feeling slightly ill, whether it’s due to a cold, flu, or other minor illness.

It is a common phrase used in everyday conversation and is understood by most people.

Common Symptoms

Some common symptoms of feeling “under the weather” include a headache, fatigue, body aches, chills, and a slight fever.

If a person is feeling “under the weather,” they may not be able to perform their usual activities and may need to rest until they feel better.

Here are a few example sentences that use the idiom “under the weather”:

  • John has been feeling a bit under the weather since yesterday.
  • Sarah is feeling under the weather, so she’s going to stay home from work today.
  • Tom has been feeling a little under the weather lately, but he’s still managing to get his work done.

Some synonyms of the idiom “under the weather” include sick, ill, unwell, poorly, ailing, indisposed, laid up, bad, and out of sorts.

In summary, “under the weather” is a common idiom used to describe feeling slightly ill or not quite oneself.

It has its origins in the sailing industry and is still widely used today.