What does “sight for sore eyes” mean?

Uncover the definition and examples of the popular idiom 'Sight for Sore Eyes,' used to describe something or someone pleasant to see. Learn more!

Understanding the Idiom

“Sight for sore eyes” is a common English phrase used to describe something or someone that is pleasant to see.

This idiom is a cliché and is often used in casual conversations.

Definition and Usage

The phrase “sight for sore eyes” is used to express relief or happiness upon seeing something or someone after a long absence or after a difficult experience.

It is often used to describe a person who is attractive or a place that is beautiful.

For example, “After a long day at work, seeing his wife waiting for him at home was a sight for sore eyes.”

Linguistic Roots

The phrase “sight for sore eyes” is believed to have originated in the 1700s.

It is a three-word homophone group, meaning that the words “sight,” “site,” and “cite” sound the same but are spelled differently.

Another three-word example is “you,” “yew,” and “ewe.” The phrase has been used in literature, including classic works of drama and fiction.

Examples and Synonyms

Here are three examples of sentences that use the idiom “sight for sore eyes”:

  • “After being away from home for months, seeing her family was a sight for sore eyes.”
  • “The park’s beautiful flowers were a sight for sore eyes after a long winter.”
  • “Seeing his girlfriend in her new dress was a sight for sore eyes.”

Some synonyms for “sight for sore eyes” include “delightful sight,” “pleasure to see,” and “welcome sight.”